Africa is a beautiful continent, full of beautiful people and cultures. This is just my attempt at sharing some of it with the world.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Hans Withoos

My Name is Blessing - for Orange Babies

2013

(via akenyangirl)

— 1 week ago with 12463 notes
"I realized that I was African when I came to the United States. Whenever Africa came up in my college classes, everyone turned to me. It didn’t matter whether the subject was Namibia or Egypt; I was expected to know, to explain."
— 2 months ago with 1599 notes

iluvsouthernafrica:

Angola:

The Motorcycle Taxi Drivers of Luanda

Photos by: Michael Magers

(via akenyangirl)

— 2 months ago with 171 notes
souls-of-my-shoes:

End of the Day - Suri Tribe by Sebastian Humphreys on Flickr.
One of the days we were at the cattle camp no adults were there at all. The previous night it was packed with young men (late teens early twenties) but they were all out at a Donga fight we learned and just the young boys were there to do all the work. They took care of business with out hitch…100’s of cattle all getting herded into the pins they have created out of trees and thorny bushes. Tending to all the fires, milking and getting blood and preparing for the evening. It was interesting to see and of course think about what an eight, nine, ten year old is responsible for in my country.

souls-of-my-shoes:

End of the Day - Suri Tribe by Sebastian Humphreys on Flickr.

One of the days we were at the cattle camp no adults were there at all. The previous night it was packed with young men (late teens early twenties) but they were all out at a Donga fight we learned and just the young boys were there to do all the work. They took care of business with out hitch…100’s of cattle all getting herded into the pins they have created out of trees and thorny bushes. Tending to all the fires, milking and getting blood and preparing for the evening. It was interesting to see and of course think about what an eight, nine, ten year old is responsible for in my country.

— 3 months ago with 37 notes
36 Hours in Zanzibar, Tanzania →

souls-of-my-shoes:

heading back there next week! :)

(Source: mollyinkenya)

— 3 months ago with 12 notes
peaceful-moon:

laughing-trees:


In this African tribe, when someone does something harmful, they take the person to the center of the village where the whole tribe comes and surrounds them.  For two days, they will say to the man all the good things that he has done. The tribe believes that each human being comes into the world as a good. Each one of us only desiring safety, love, peace and happiness.  But sometimes, in the pursuit of these things, people make mistakes. The community sees those mistakes as a cry for help. They unite then to lift him, to reconnect him with his true nature, to remind him who he really is, until he fully remembers the truth of which he had been temporarily disconnected: “I am good.” Shikoba Nabajyotisaikia! NABAJYOTISAIKIA, is a compliment used in South Africa and means: “I respect you, I cherish you. You matter to me.” In response, people say SHIKOBA, which is: “So, I exist for you.”

:’))))))

WHY ISN’T THIS A THING IN ALL CULTURES

peaceful-moon:

laughing-trees:

In this African tribe, when someone does something harmful, they take the person to the center of the village where the whole tribe comes and surrounds them.

For two days, they will say to the man all the good things that he has done.

The tribe believes that each human being comes into the world as a good. Each one of us only desiring safety, love, peace and happiness.

But sometimes, in the pursuit of these things, people make mistakes.

The community sees those mistakes as a cry for help.

They unite then to lift him, to reconnect him with his true nature, to remind him who he really is, until he fully remembers the truth of which he had been temporarily disconnected: “I am good.”

Shikoba Nabajyotisaikia!

NABAJYOTISAIKIA, is a compliment used in South Africa and means: “I respect you, I cherish you. You matter to me.” In response, people say SHIKOBA, which is: “So, I exist for you.”

:’))))))

WHY ISN’T THIS A THING IN ALL CULTURES

(Source: enigmatic-being, via daaaaaaavid)

— 3 months ago with 194402 notes

yagazieemezi:

Meet Your Photographer: Lawrence Agyei

"Every portrait is an opportunity to connect more deeply with the person you are shooting. I truly enjoy shooting portraits because the possibilities are so endless. The range of human emotion is there just waiting to be captured and I love how even the same emotions can look different depending on the person or surroundings." - Lawrence

View more

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

(via iandafrica)

— 4 months ago with 975 notes
shapeandcolour:

This weekend, activists in Uganda - a country where homosexuality is punishable by death - held their first Pride. 
This is the epitome of courage. I have no other words. 

shapeandcolour:

This weekend, activists in Uganda - a country where homosexuality is punishable by death - held their first Pride. 

This is the epitome of courage. I have no other words. 

(via teaandtoastify)

— 6 months ago with 323942 notes
#uganda 
So Corinne Hofmann posted this on Facebook not too long ago, and I wanted to share it with all of my followers! 
If you haven’t read her books, Hofmann has written four books: The White Masai, Back from Africa, Reunion in Barsaloi, and now Africa my Passion. 
The first book is about how she went to Mombasa, Kenya, fell in love with a Samburu, and decided to move to Barsaloi to marry him and live there forever. As you might have guessed from the following books that doesn’t go too well. But it’s one of my favorite books and I actually cried at the end. It’s beautifully written!
The second book is about Corinne’s life back in Switzerland, her daughter, readjusting, and all that it involves.
In he third book Corinne goes back to Barsaloi and meets her family for the first time in 15 years.
I haven’t read the last book because I just found out today that it had been translated, but as far as I know it has three parts: Corinne on a trip in Namibia, Nairobi and the slums surrounding it, and finally Corinne’s daughter meeting her father for the first time since Corinne left Kenya when the daughter was a very young child.
So get reading, you! These are some of my favorite books and when I read them I feel like I’m part of the story. Of course, I may be biased from being in a relationship with a Kenyan man myself, but… Oh well. Oh and I’m not getting anything for doing this, I just like the books and I want others to like them too.

So Corinne Hofmann posted this on Facebook not too long ago, and I wanted to share it with all of my followers!

If you haven’t read her books, Hofmann has written four books: The White Masai, Back from Africa, Reunion in Barsaloi, and now Africa my Passion.

The first book is about how she went to Mombasa, Kenya, fell in love with a Samburu, and decided to move to Barsaloi to marry him and live there forever. As you might have guessed from the following books that doesn’t go too well. But it’s one of my favorite books and I actually cried at the end. It’s beautifully written!

The second book is about Corinne’s life back in Switzerland, her daughter, readjusting, and all that it involves.

In he third book Corinne goes back to Barsaloi and meets her family for the first time in 15 years.

I haven’t read the last book because I just found out today that it had been translated, but as far as I know it has three parts: Corinne on a trip in Namibia, Nairobi and the slums surrounding it, and finally Corinne’s daughter meeting her father for the first time since Corinne left Kenya when the daughter was a very young child.

So get reading, you! These are some of my favorite books and when I read them I feel like I’m part of the story. Of course, I may be biased from being in a relationship with a Kenyan man myself, but… Oh well. Oh and I’m not getting anything for doing this, I just like the books and I want others to like them too.

— 7 months ago
#corinne hofmann  #the white masai  #bavk from africa  #reunion in barsaloi  #africa my passion  #books  #book  #reading  #literature  #recommended  #recommendation  #read  #kenya  #kenyan  #africa  #african 

ukpuru:

weloveblackgirls:

autobiographyofasankster:

weloveblackgirls:

Where twerking originated

The fact that none of them are the typical stick thin. Love.

Because in African culture . It is more looked down upon to be skinny , sometimes they’ll come to you and ask you if your sick or if something’s wrong . This is Africa’s definition of the perfect body

Well it’s a whole lot more intricate than that and a lot of societies and cultures would make this idea of all void (including in Nigeria) which isn’t surprising because there’s no such thing as African culture as one thing.

(Source: iamforevernigerian, via iandafrica)

— 8 months ago with 27318 notes